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Tag Archives: Featured

Time is Muscle: An important new medical report: July 2010.

20 Sep

Time is Muscle: An important new medical report: July 2010.

Information contained in this important new medical report which was published in the British Journal of Cardiology: July 2010, could help save thousands of lives and have a major impact on public health in the United Kingdom and throughout the world.

” Randomised trials have shown that the earlier aspirin is taken by patients with myocardial infarction, the greater the reduction in deaths. We suggest, therefore, that patients known to be at risk of an AMI, including older people, should be advised to carry a few tablets of soluble aspirin at all times, and chew and swallow a tablet immediately, if they experience severe chest pain.

A cross-European study estimated that the median FMC in the UK is 68 minutes, but in other European countries the median delay was around 150–200 minutes. It seems, therefore, that the opportunity is widespread for what could be termed ‘immediate’ aspirin, that is, aspirin taken while medical help is awaited. (more…)

Do Not Wait and Die!

26 Jan

Do Not Wait and Die!

If you suffer from chest pain, seek help immediately by dialling 999 or 112.  Do not wait and die.

Early use of 300mg of Aspirin has been proven to improve survival and outcome from myocardial infarction and is used by Paramedics in UK ambulance services as a first line treatment. Early administration of aspirin can produce major benefits and is safe to use in patients who are not allergic to aspirin and do not have ulcer problems. Carrying aspirin and knowing what to do in a cardiac emergency may help save your life or that of another”

Dr Iain Robertson-Steel, MRCGP DIMC RCSEd, formerly Consultant Medical Director of a major UK Ambulance Service and currently a Health Board lead on Unscheduled Care supports the early administration of aspirin to appropriate patients; he carries aspirin himself for emergency personal use.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

Life saving early and immediate aspirin: too little too late

23 Jan

Life saving early and immediate aspirin: too little too late

There are a number of reasons why the earlier aspirin is given the greater the potential for saving life: Platelet emboli have been found within the coronary circulation in subjects whose death has been ‘‘sudden’’. If taken early enough, aspirin could cause disaggregation of the platelets in an embolus, could reduce the growth of any such emboli, and could prevent the development of a thrombus and its stabilisation by the incorporation of fibrin. Platelet aggregation and embolisation are highly active in unstable angina and aspirin is of greatly enhanced efficacy in this situation. Evidence suggests that the reduction in relative risk for subsequent non-fatal MI or death after aspirin administration is greater for unstable angina (51%) than it is for MI (25%). Antiplatelet agents also play an important role in the management of patients with non-ST segment elevation MI. There is a peak in the occurrence of MI in the early morning between about 04.00 and 10.00 h and this coincides with an increased sensitivity of platelets to aggregating agents. The readiness with which a patient is likely to call an ambulance or a doctor, and the availability of help during these hours, is probably less than later in the day. Furthermore, it is of relevance to ‘‘self help’’ in this situation that in the US Physicians trial it was found that the reduction in MI caused by aspirin treatment was significantly greater during the early morning (59%) than during the later part of the day (34%). Most patients with an ST segment elevation MI are likely to receive thrombolytic therapy. There is a pronounced heightening of platelet activity after thrombolysis, and prior treatment with aspirin abolishes the excess in re-infarction that otherwise follows fibrinolysis. It is essential therefore that aspirin is given before fibrinolytic therapy is commenced.
The earlier fibrinolysis is started the better, and the delegation of this to paramedics has been recommended.

The best way to ensure that aspirin has first been taken is for the patient to have taken it him/herself.

Postgrad Med J 2008
Life saving early and immediate aspirin: too little too late.
Malcolm Woollard, Peter C Elwood, Gareth Morgan.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

A headache for paramedics?

23 Jan

A headache for paramedics?

Excerpt from the Emergency Medical Journal 2001.

Aspirin has been shown to be beneficial after a myocardial infarction and for other acute coronary syndromes. However, variances in the proportion of patients with suspected iscaemic heart disease given aspirin in different ambulance services indicates the need for a re-emphasis on the importance of this treatment. A standard protocol for all UK ambulance services should be devised that minimises the number of contraindications to aspirin and otherwise requires its administration to all patients with acute coronary syndromes or suspected myocardial infarction. Regular, standardised audits of compliance should also be conducted and their results widely disseminated.

Pre-Hospital aspirin for suspected myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndromes: A headache for paramedics?
M.Woollard, A. Smith, P.Elwwod.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

The science behind immediate aspirin

10 Jan

The science behind immediate aspirin

A summary of the supporting evidence that immediate aspirin really can save lives.

There is strong evidence that aspirin, taken during a heart attack, can reduce the size of the thrombus (clot) causing the attack [1,2] and may even cause the platelets in the clot to disperse [3,4]. Aspirin also has effects on processes other than clotting [5,6], suggesting that if taken very early in an attack, the damage to the heart could be reduced and additional lives saved.

Patients known to be at risk of a heart attack, including all persons over about 50 years of age, would be well advised to carry a few tablets of soluble aspirin at all times, and chew and swallow a tablet immediately, if they experience severe chest pain, even as they are phoning 999. (more…)

Immediate Aspirin Saved my life!

22 Dec

Immediate Aspirin Saved my life!

This viewer appeared on ITV’s ‘This Morning’ programme after having taken Dr Steele’s advice about carrying an emergency dose of Aspirin. He tells how, after suffering a severe heart attack, he took the aspirin and lived to tell the tale.
Watch the clip here: