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Beware Dangerous Emails – ‘immediate’ aspirin

21 May

Beware Dangerous Emails – ‘immediate’ aspirin

Misleading information is sent out regarding Bayer Quick Release Crystals

There are several versions of an email circulating which state that Bayer Quick Release Crystals (powder) is suitable for use as ‘immediate’ aspirin in case of a suspected heart attack – it is NOT. These emails go on to suggest that the recipient forwards the email to ten of their contacts in order to ’save lives’. (more…)

ASPOD® included in delegate pack at United Nations Day Conference

7 Jan

ASPOD® included in delegate pack at United Nations Day Conference


Delegates to a United Nations conference are given an ASPOD® as part of their delegate packs

On 30th September 2010 a conference was held at Cardiff University in Celebration of United Nations International Day of Older People, and the theme was ‘Promoting Active and Healthy Ageing’. Around 180 delegates attended the Conference, a high proportion were from Health Departments, Departments of Social Work and the Voluntary sector. Cardiff University included an ASPOD® in each delegate pack. (more…)

Time is Muscle: An important new medical report: July 2010.

20 Sep

Time is Muscle: An important new medical report: July 2010.

Information contained in this important new medical report which was published in the British Journal of Cardiology: July 2010, could help save thousands of lives and have a major impact on public health in the United Kingdom and throughout the world.

” Randomised trials have shown that the earlier aspirin is taken by patients with myocardial infarction, the greater the reduction in deaths. We suggest, therefore, that patients known to be at risk of an AMI, including older people, should be advised to carry a few tablets of soluble aspirin at all times, and chew and swallow a tablet immediately, if they experience severe chest pain.

A cross-European study estimated that the median FMC in the UK is 68 minutes, but in other European countries the median delay was around 150–200 minutes. It seems, therefore, that the opportunity is widespread for what could be termed ‘immediate’ aspirin, that is, aspirin taken while medical help is awaited. (more…)

The Truth About Aspirin and Heart Attacks

18 May

Aspirin

Every year almost a quarter of a million people suffer heart attacks in the UK and a third die before reaching hospital*

Aspirin has been shown to reduce deaths from heart attack by 20-25%* and the earlier it is taken, the greater the benefit. When Paramedics are called to a person with a suspected heart attack, the first things they should do, if possible, is to give the patient a 300mg tablet of aspirin (unless the patient is hypersensitive to aspirin). This is referred to as ‘early aspirin’. But, a self-administered dose of aspirin taken upon onset of symptoms can be of even greater benefit; this is referred to as ‘immediate aspirin’. (more…)

Question from a reader …..

19 Mar


Question regarding: ASPOD as featured in the Daily Mail

RF (address withheld)
rxxxxxxxxfxxxxxx@gmail.com

Submitted on 2010/03/15 at 1:43pm

I have just recently purchased a ASPOD pod, trying to purchase 300mg soluble aspirin from the chemist I was told that they could not supply 300mg aspirin without a doctors prescription, can you inform me where I can purchase this size of tablet.

Regards

RF

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Aspod Admin
supprt@aspod.co.uk
Submitted on 2010/03/18 at 9:39pm

Reply:
Hi Roger,

Confusing I know, some doctors, pharmacists and academics routinely use the word ‘soluble’ aspirin,  in this context the word ‘dispersible’ has the same meaning. In the UK dispersible aspirin 300mg which is what you need for your Aspod is readily available from all pharmacies.

If we can help further please contact us.

 

 

 

Aspod Support.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

Why everyone should carry an aspirin – The Daily Mail

9 Mar

The following excerpts are taken from a feature in the Good Health section of the Daily Mail, published on 22 February, 2010.

When Chris Atkinson felt a searing pain in his chest, he knew straight away what was wrong. He had witnessed his father’s heart attack and realised the pain and cold sweats couldn’t be anything else. But the 54 year old was alone in a quiet area of Portsmouth and, with the pain intensifying, he feared he wouldn’t survive – as well as his father, his three uncles had all died of heart attacks.

Then Chris remembered he had an aspirin in his car. The previous week he’d seen a television report on how taking an aspirin during a heart attack can help to reduce the risk of it proving fatal.

Chris rang his wife and asked her to call an ambulance – he was so breathless it seemed simpler than doing it himself – while he staggered to the car and took the cheweable aspirin.

‘It took me two minutes to get to the car and it was a realy struggle, as I was panting for breath and clutching my chest with the pain, but the tought of that aspirin and how it might save ny life drove me on’.

When an ambulance arrived ten minutes later Chris’s lips had gone grey. The first thing they asked was whether he had taken anything. I told them about the aspirin and they said “thank goodness for that”, says Chris. At the hospital, the consultant said the aspirin probably saved my life.

Studies have found that taking an aspirin during a heart attack can literally make the difference between life and death – and the sooner you take one, the better your chance of survival.

One major study showed that taking an aspirin as soon as possible during a heart attack and for a month after reduced the risk of dying by a quarter and those benefits lasted for at least ten years.

Dr Adrian Banning, consultant cardiologist at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, says about 50 percent of heart attacks prove fatal within the first few hours, so the sooner people take it the better, he says, yet many people do not see a paramedic for on average two hours after the onset of symptoms.

For some it is six hours or longer, as most heart attacks occur in the early morning and people delay calling, thinking that their symptoms are indigestion or a muscular pain.

However, if people get a sharp radiating pain that speads down one arm, I would urge them to take one aspirin – one or two 300mg pills instantly. I’d urge everyone over 50 and everyone with a family history of heart attacks to carry aspirin with them at all times to take in an emergency.

Chris Atkinson has no doubt that calling 999 – and taking an aspirin saved his life.

He now takes a daily aspirin, on his doctor’s advice. And he’s giving all his close friends a special key fob – called an ASPOD – with room to hold emergency aspirin.

It might not seem a terribly exciting present. but one day it might come in very, very useful, he says.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

Which groups have an increased risk of heart attack?

8 Mar

The group at the greatest risk of a heart attack are those who have already experienced an attack. Others at increased risk include those who smoke, those who are on treatment for raised blood pressure or have a high cholesterol level and those who are inactive physically, especially if obese. People with diabetes are also at increased risk. It is worth noting that the risk of a heart attack roughly doubles every ten to fifteen years of age.

CHEWABLE ASPIRIN ???

28 Feb

Contrary to information published in the Daily Mail, Tuesday 23rd February 2010. It is NOT necessary to buy ‘chewable’ aspirin to gain the benefits of self administered ‘immediate aspirin’.

It is, however, imperative that the aspirin deliver its platelet inhibition as quickly as possible. This is best achieved by chewing and swallowing a soluble aspirin as opposed to taking solid dose aspirin.

In order to find out which presentation worked fastest, researchers in Texas asked 12 volunteers to take a 325-mg dose of aspirin in three different ways; by swallowing a tablet with water, by chewing the tablet for 30 seconds before swallowing it, or by drinking water with an effervescent aspirin dissolved in it. Each subject tried all three methods on an empty stomach on different days. Scientists monitored blood levels of aspirin and its active ingredient, salicylate, at frequent intervals, and they also measured thromboxane B2 (TxB2), an indicator of platelet activation that drops as platelets are inhibited.

By all three measurements, chewed aspirin worked fastest , taking only 14 minutes for the chewed tablet to produce maximal platelet inhibition; it took effervescent aspirin 16 minutes and the swallowed solid dose tablet 26 minutes.

IF YOU HAVE A CHOICE, DO NOT USE ENTERIC COATED ASPIRIN. IT WILL ACT MORE SLOWLY, EVEN IF CHEWED.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

What does the ASPIRIN FOUNDATION say about early aspirin?

7 Feb

The ISIS-2 trial, co-ordinated in Oxford, reported on randomised aspirin and thrombolytic treatment after infarction in over 17,000 patients and the CAST trial involving 21,000 stroke patients gave evidence of a reduction in mortality when aspirin was given early after the onset of symptoms. The ISIS-2 trial showed that aspirin given within 0-4 hours of a heart attack reduced risk by 25% and if given within 5-24 hours after symptoms, reduced risk by 21%.

A report by the British Heart Foundation now recommends early therapeutic intervention with aspirin and rapid transferral of patients to hospital for intravenous thrombolysis with what is often described as a ‘clot buster’ drug.

Members of a family or work colleagues are thus ideally placed to begin early treatment with aspirin in patients with suspected acute MI, since aspirin can easily be given straight away. The recommended dose of aspirin given at this stage is 150mg (half a standard aspirin tablet) and the patient should be advised to chew the tablet to aid absorption. You must confirm that the patient is conscious and able to swallow before recommending the early or immediate administration of aspirin. Unconscious patients or those unable to swallow should not be given any medication by mouth but referred to emergency professional treatment immediately.

The advantage of this therapeutic strategy is that if the pain turns out to be simply muscular, aspirin will not have been inappropriate, whereas if the pain does arise from an infarct, ‘immediate’ or ‘early’ aspirin intervention may well save a life or prevent disability.

The Aspirin Foundation
Aspirin at Christmas
11.12.2001

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.

‘Good Health Insight’ – Daily Mail, Tuesday February 22nd 2000

6 Feb

In Sweden men and women over the age of 35 never go out without a little white pill in their wallet. It could mean the difference between life and death in the event of a heart attack. The Swedes have taken on board the message of heart specialists that the simple aspirin could have a major impact on surviving a coronary. At the first sign of severe chest pains, Swedes call an ambulance and then pop a tablet in their mouths.

‘Good Health Insight’ – Daily Mail, Tuesday February 22nd 2000

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IMPORTANT NOTE: IF YOU NEED TO TAKE AN EMERGENCY DOSE OF ASPIRIN YOU MUST DIAL 999 FOR AN AMBULANCE FIRST – AND THEN IMMEDIATELY CHEW AND SWALLOW ONE 300mg SOLUBLE ASPIRIN.  If in doubt speak to your Doctor.